Why Play Outdoors?

outdoor games

Children become introvert if they are inside the house and playing by themselves. Through physical play outside they learn how to grow with people, adjust to the upcoming environment and develop self confidence which is quintessential for their physical and mental growth. From court games like tennis, badminton; or the field like hockey; or backyard games like cornhole or ladder golf.The self confidence can help translating into social confidence, which becomes helpful when they grow up. They develop a kind of positive attitude when they get outdoors. This kind of confidence helps them grow along with other children. This is the best time when they are learning to be a social human being.

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Importance of Outdoor Games

cycling

Kids these days are not so interested in the outdoor games. They love to play the indoor games and enjoy them whole day. To keep them healthy, outdoor games are of utmost importance. American kids are very much attached to their favorite TV channels or addicted to the video games. This hinders the growth of children to a large extent. For more information follow this link for tips and advice straight from the source.

Outdoor games helps kids open up their mind and freshen them for the rest of the day. It also keeps them more active.
Following are some of the benefits of outdoor games:

Health benefits

Outdoor games make kids stay more healthy and active which will benefit them in the long run. It helps fight against obesity. Early morning outdoor games are the best ones. An outdoor game increases the immunity power in kids and adults. Playing outdoor games will develop the confidence amongst kids and also make them sportive. This in turn helps them to live their life in a sportive way.

Behavior in a group

Playing outdoor games in groups teaches how to behave in a group and be part of it. It increases the level of patience in kids. Over and above it teaches the mannerism to be in groups and their behavioral pattern also changes accordingly in the long run. This helps kids to respect their peers, friends and elders.

Socializing

Playing outdoor games with neighboring kids helps our kids to learn how to be social. As man is a social animal, we cannot manage without living and involving in this society. Socializing, if developed from inception, can help a lot when kids grow up.

Fun of outdoor games

Outdoor games characterize the childhood of our kids. For well-being of adulthood we need to have full of enjoyment in the childhood.

These memories live with us for lifelong. Outdoor games are actually fun and can be made more enjoyable if there are varieties of options available for kids. Whether it is cycling, hiking, skating, skipping, jogging, football etc. there are endless number of outdoor games available for our kids.

Lessons for life

Outdoor games teach children how to manage things on their own.

Encourage your kids to play games where they can take up small responsibilities. Also guide them how to handle people, things and situations as and when they arise at the same time giving them freedom to express and act as per their rightful thoughts. Giving them their space not only teaches them a lot but also makes them responsible about the environment and society around them.

cycling

Rules

When kids play any kind of outdoor games, the games come with specific set of rules. Hence, to enjoy the game they need to make sure they abide by it. This in the long run makes them realize if they live life with a specific set of rules which are not to be broken, they can live a more disciplined life in future.for more details,follow this link at http://sports-kunal.blogspot.com/2011/06/importance-of-outdoor-game.html.

It is challenging to provide kids with the space and opportunity of letting them play outdoor games on daily basis. As parents we need to understand the importance of outdoor games and convince our kids and make them aware of how essential are outdoor activities for anyone.

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Badminton for Health

badminton health effect

Badminton is a very popular game and can be played both indoor and outdoor: Sports and health go hand in hand. A sports person is always a healthy person. Any kind of sports will increase your body immunity.

If you are looking for reducing weight or being more active, playing badminton is the best way to work out. It’s a little complex and a brainy game; hence it triggers the mental power of thinking and concentration. Playing badminton early in the morning for at least one hour daily makes your rest of the day an active day.

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7 Camping Game Ideas

camping ideas

Camping games are for nature lovers. If you love nature, camping games are best suited for you. Camping on regular basis keeps you coming back to nature and influences your fitness. Camping with your family and friends at regular intervals gives you your personal time off from work. The best part of camping is if you have a smaller budget going for a campaign would be a great idea for less cost.

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The Badminton Smash

Badminton Smash

There are all different kinds of badminton players. So, what kind are you? You might be what’s called a touch player where you try to move the shuttlecock around the court with angled shots and deception. Or you might be a power player who loves to just smash the shuttlecock.

Badminton Smash

The badminton smash is one of the hardest shots in badminton to defend against. It is executed by bringing your racket up high over you head – almost as if you were serving in a game of tennis – and then hitting the shuttlecock with as much force as possible down towards the surface of your opponent’s court. Since your opponent’s return shot must travel upwards, the smash sets you up for a number of different shots. You can do a tight, spinning net shot, yet another smash to the opposite sideline of your opponent’s court or a cross-court drop shot. If your opponent backs away from the net, expecting another smash, you can also choose to block the shuttlecock to the net.

Where To Smash

In a singles match, the most common badminton smash shot is towards your opponent’s sideline. This can be very effective because it forces your opponent to cover the full width of the court.

When you smash to a sideline, your opponent has to move quickly sideways to reach the shuttlecock. This can force your opponent to take the shuttlecock at full stretch or even behind the body, making it more difficult for him or her to do a good return shot. The disadvantage of a cross-court smash is that your opponent’s return is also the easiest – the straight block – which, in turn, forces you to travel diagonally.

The Body Smash

Another valid tactic in badminton is to make a badminton smash shot directly at your opponent’s body. In this case, your opponent may not be able to get his racket into a good position to return the smash. This smash is generally played as an attempted winning shot. However, the body smash may not be as effective as a smash towards a sideline because it doesn’t force your opponent to cover more of the court.

A straight badminton smash shot is a safe smash as this effectively limits your opponent’s ability to return the smash at a number of different angles. Also, straight smashes are much faster than cross-court smashes as they need to travel a shorter distance.

How To Defend Against A Smash Shot

The most common defense against a badminton smash shot is a block to the net. This is the only shot that forces your opponent to move into the forecourt after the smash. A block to the net is not only one of the easiest shots to play; it actually gives you a good chance at seizing control of the net yourself.

How To Do A Block To The Net

To execute this shot, you hold your racket about head high with its face open and square to the net. You watch the shuttlecock carefully as your opponent smashes it and then move the racket’s head quickly into the path of the shuttlecock. You then block the shuttlecock without swinging the racket at all. Instead, you simply let the shuttlecock hit the face of your racket and then drop down into your opponent’s side of the court. The best block to the net is one where the shuttlecock lands near your opponent’s short service line. Learn more here about the badminton smash.

A block to your opponent’s middle is rarely a good idea as all this does is limit your opponent’s return angles. A straight block is the easiest shot and the best choice if your opponent has smashed cross-court. This is because a straight block will force your opponent to travel the longest possible distance to return it. The downside is that the shot is very predictable and your opponent may be expecting you to play it.

The best response after a straight smash is a cross-court block because it forces your opponent to change direction and cover more distance. However, it is also more difficult to execute, especially when the smash is hit very hard.

Badminton Smash

Try A Lift

Another way to return a badminton smash shot is with a lift but is generally not as effective. A lift, or high, looping return, can allow your opponent to continue smashing. However, a series of these smashes can wear out your opponent. But you do need to make sure you get good height and depth on the lifts.go to the website http://www.badminton-information.com/badminton_smash.html for more information.

In badminton, a well placed smash can mean a winning shot. But if you’re on the receiving end of the badminton smash shot, don’t despair. As you have read, there are several things you can do to effectively return a smash and even take control of the net.

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Badminton Rules For Family Fun

CG Badminton

If you’re a backyard badminton player and playing just for fun, there are not a lot of rules to remember. The important badminton rules to remember are:

1. You need to win two out of three games to win a match.
2. You need to score 15 points to win a game unless you want to play just one game to 21 points.
3. Only the person serving can win a point.
4. You win a point when the shuttle falls to the ground on your opponent’s side of the court or your opponent hits the shuttle out of bounds.
5. If the shuttle sticks in the net when you serve, you get to serve over.
6. If you don’t score a point, you lose service.

Who Serves First In Badminton?

So, there you are, the four of you, all set to begin a hot game of badminton. You’ve got a nice court set up, grass mowed down to 2”, but wait. How do you determine who serves first? Or, for that matter, how do you decide which team gets which side of the net?

In a friendly, family game, you might just go to one side of the net and holler, “hey, you serve first”.

Badminton Rules For First Serve

If you want to abide by the rules of badminton, you do a thing first called “the toss”. This means you toss a coin and the winner or winning side gets to choose to serve first or not serve first; or choose which end to play on. The losing side then has a choice of the remaining alternatives. For more reviews, follow this link for more details.

Badminton Rules For A Game

The rules of badminton state that a doubles match or men’s single match consists of 15 points. However, if the score is 14-all, the side that reached 14 first has the option of “setting” the game to 3. The score is called “love-all” and whichever side scores 3 points first wins the game.

If players choose to “set”, the score is no longer called “love-all.” Instead, play is continued until one person or team has 17 points. In either case, the claim to “set” the game must be made before the next service is delivered after the score has reached 14-all. In either case, the call to “set” the game must be made before the next service after the score reaches 14.

The ladies’ badminton game consists of 11 points. If the score reaches 9-all, the player who first reached 9 has the option of “setting” the game to 3, much as in a men’s match. Like a men’s match, the score is called “love-all,” and the first player to win 3 points wins the game. If the score has reached 10-all, the player who first reached 10 has the option of “setting” the game at 2.

Also, if one side rejected the “setting” at the first opportunity, it still has the opportunity to “set” if there is a second opportunity to do so.

Finally, as an option, the players can agree to play just one game to 21 points. In this case, the “setting” is at 19 and 20.

Badminton Match Rules

The rules of badminton say that a match consists of the best of three games. The players or teams change sides at the end of the second game. Players also change sides in the third game (if there is a third game), when the leading score reaches 8 in a game of 15 points or 6 in a game of 11 points.

In doubles and men’s singles, the first team to score 15 points wins the game. In women’s singles, the first side to score 11 points wins the game.

The side that won a game serves first in the next game. Only the side that is serving can score a point.

Badminton Rules on Scoring

In badminton, you score a point when you are serving and your opponent makes a “fault” (see explanation of a fault, below) or the shuttle ceases to be in play because it has touched the surface of your opponent’s court.

However, you do not score a point if you make a fault or if the shuttle touches the surface on your side of the court. In this case, the right to serve goes to your opponent.

Badminton Rules For Singles Matches

In a game of men’s singles, you serve from and receive in the right service court when you or your opponent has scored an even number of points. When you or your opponent has scored an uneven number of points, you serve from and receive in the left service court.

You score a point and serve again from the alternate service court when one of two things happens – either your opponent makes a ‘fault’ or the shuttle ceases to be in play because it touches the surface of your opponent’s side of court.

No points are scored when you make a fault or the shuttle ceases to be in play because it has touched the surface on your side of the court. However, your opponent will get to serve next.

Badminton Rules For Doubles Matches

At the start of a doubles game, the side with the right to serve does so from the right service court. Only the opponent standing diagonal to the server can return the serve. If your opponent’s partner touches or hits the shuttle, this is considered to be a fault, and your side scores a point.

You serve from or receive into the right service court at the start of the game or if your side or your opponent’s side has an even number of points. Conversely, you serve from or receive in the left service court when you or your opponents’ score is an odd number of points.

The reverse of this applies to your partner.

After the first person has served, that person who was the initial receiver gets to serve next. Then, the receiver’s partner serves. Following this, the serve passes to the opponent who is due to serve from the right service court, then to that player’s partner and so on.

Badminton Rules On Service Errors

An error in service occurs when a player serves out of turn or when a player is standing in the wrong service court when preparing to receive a shot and the shot has been made.

If you discover a service court error after the next service, the error does not need to be corrected. If the error is discovered before the next service, these are the rules.

If both sides made the error, it is considered to be a “let.”
If one side committed the error and won the rally, it will also be a “let”.

If one side committed the error and lost the rally, the error doesn’t need to be corrected.

Badminton Rules On Faults

The rules of badminton say the following are faults:

If the shuttle lands outside the court, passes through or under the net, fails to pass the net, touches the ceiling or side walls, touches the person or dress of a player or touches any other object or person.

If the initial point of contact of the shuttle is not on the striker’s side of the net. However, the striker may follow the shuttle over the net with his or her racket in the course of a stroke.

If a player touches the net or its support with his or her racket, person or dress, or invades the opponent’s court over the net with a racquet.

If a player invades an opponent’s court under the net with racket or person such that an opponent is obstructed or distracted or obstructs an opponent that prevents an opponent from making a legal stroke where the shuttle is followed over the net.

If a player deliberately distracts an opponent by shouting or making gestures or any other such action.

If, during a stroke, the shuttle is caught and held onto the racket and then slung.

If a player uses two strokes to hit the shuttle twice in succession.

If a player and the player’s partner successively hit the shuttle or if the shuttle touches a player’s racket and continues toward the back of the court.

If a player is guilty of flagrant, repeated or persistent offenses under the Law of Continuous Play, Misconduct, Penalties.

If, when the shuttle is served, it is caught on the net and remains suspended on the top or if it is caught on the net after passing over the net following a service.

Badminton Rules On “Lets”

A “let” is called by the umpire or a player to halt play. A “let” is:

If the shuttle is caught in the net and remains suspended on top or after passing over the net, or is caught in the net.
If the receiver and server are both faulted at the same time during service.

If the server serves before the receiver is ready.

CG Badminton

If during play, the shuttle disintegrates and its base separates completely from the rest of the shuttle.

If a judge is unsighted or the umpire is unable to make a decision.
If the “let” occurs following a service court error, the play since the last service doesn’t count and the player who was serving will serve again.

Badminton Rules On The Shuttle

A shuttle is not in play when it strikes the net and remains attached to it or is suspended from the top of the net. It is also not in play when it strikes the net or post and starts to fall towards the surface of the court on the striker’s side of the net. Finally, a shuttle is considered to be not in play when it hits the surface of the court or a “let” has occurred.

There are definitely a lot of badminton rules to remember but knowing these rules can actually make badminton more enjoyable. And who knows? Knowing these badminton rules could even help you win a match or two.

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Badminton Court

badminton court

If you play badminton just for the fun of it, you can set up a badminton court in your backyard, assuming you have enough space and a pretty flat yard. If you don’t, you should be able to find a flat area in a nearby park to set up badminton court for an afternoon of family fun.

Badminton Court Dimensions

The official dimensions of a badminton court are 44’ by 20’. However, if you’re playing just for fun and don’t have quite that much room, you can shrink these dimensions somewhat. Just remember that if you shrink the length, you need to shrink the width, too. For example, if you need to lop 10’ off the length of your court, you should also shrink the width by one-fourth. For more details, click more tips here.

Making A Badminton Court

Before you start creating your badminton court, be sure to clear away all obstructions such as rocks, tree stumps, etc. You will also want to mow the grass to a height of about 2”.

You will start with a tape measure and measure off the court’s length and width. The idea is to create a perfect rectangle which you may not be able to do on the first try. So, a good idea is to mark each line with at least two dots of white paint. This way, you can make some adjustments later if needed.

Next, form the court using white or yellow string and the white dots. If it looks like you’ve made a good rectangle, you can then create the finished lines with white or yellow spray paint. If the rectangle looks lopsided either way, be sure to make the necessary corrections before you spray the lines.

Placing The Posts And Net

Once you have your badminton court laid out, you will need to measure in halfway from one of the back lines to place your posts and the net. For example, if you’re making a full size court, you will need to measure off 22’ from one of the back lines. Go to http://www.badminton-information.com/badminton-court.html for more details.

Step four is to divide each side of the two halves of the court in two to form the right and left service courts. In other words, make a line halfway between the court’s sidelines – or 10’ for a full size court. You should now have four rectangles, each measuring 22’ by 10’.

Creating A Badminton Service Line

Next measure out 6’ 6’ from the center line (where the net will be) and make a line. This will be your service line. You will need to do this on both sides of the centerline as there needs to be a service line on both sides of the net.

If you will be playing doubles, you will also need to create a line 3’ inside both your sidelines (the width lines).

Finally, install the badminton net. Most nets are just placed in the ground with string-tied stakes. However, you can also get a more “professional” net that has tension devices to help keep the net from sagging over time.

Preferred Surfaces For A Badminton Court

badminton court

If you are a more serious badminton player, you’ll be playing badminton indoors. If you play at a recreation center that has badminton tournaments or a badminton “ladder”, you can’t be much of a chooser. You’ll probably be playing on some form of wooden plank flooring – one that’s used for basketball, badminton and who knows what else. If you’re lucky, the facility will lay out rubber mats on the wooden flooring for badminton, as this is easier on the back and legs than just the wood. If you’re lucky and live near a badminton club, you might play on a surface created specifically for badminton such as Play-Turf® or a vinyl-pvc sports flooring.

You may not have much of a choice in badminton flooring but if you do, the preferred choice would be either the Play-Turf of the vinyl-pvc sports flooring. Both of these provide a good surface for turning, running and stopping; and are easier on your body than wooden-plank flooring.

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